ScreenSite Data: Gender Studies Syllabi

ScreenSite collected over 500 links to media-related syllabi. In our move from WordPress to a simple HTML Website in 2019, we have preserved all these data. We may occasionally add to them as ScreenSite moves forward, but we are not actively collecting new listings anymore.

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The list below contains Gender Studies syllabi links. For syllabi in other categories, please follow the links below.

Apologies in advance: The data may have gotten a bit dirty in the transition from WordPress to HTML.


56 Gender Studies Syllabi

Sorted alphabetically.


African American Cinema

University of Southern California (last updated: 23 Oct 2018)  https://web-app.usc.edu/soc/syllabus/20091/18098

Anthropology of Sex and Gender

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://academic.reed.edu/anthro/344/index.html

Black Studies Dissemination in the Age of New Media

Dr. Kevin Michael Foster, University of Texas at Austin . From the Website: "This course introduces graduate studentsto the work of black studies researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and helps disseminate that same body of work to a broader audience via social and new media." (last updated: 26 Aug 2013)  http://www.academia.edu/1385763/Syllabus_Black_Studies_in_the_Age_of_New_Media

Cities of Dreadful Delight: Gender, Race, and Sexuality in the Americas

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://www.people.man.ac.uk/~mfsssnaz/hi3952syl.html

Council on the Status of Women in Linguistics Language and Gender

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jlawler/gender.html

Economics of Gender (ECON 447)

(last updated: 23 Aug 2013)  http://www.washington.edu/students/icd/S/econ/447erose.html

Economics of Gender and the Family (ECON 248)

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://myslu.stlawu.edu/~shorwitz/Teaching/s01248.htm

Education and the Status of Women: A Comparatice Perspective

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://www.stanford.edu/class/ed197/index.htm

Feminism and Film

Vanderbilt University (last updated: 23 Oct 2018)  https://my.vanderbilt.edu/wgs272/syllabus/

Feminist Linguistic Theory and 19th Century British Women Writers

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://www.uwosh.edu/faculty_staff/shaffer/FEMLING.htm

Feminist Media Studies

Tace Hedrick, University of Florida (last updated: 23 Oct 2018)  https://wst.ufl.edu/files/Feminist-Media-Studies.pdf

From Mayberry to "Netflix and Chill": Topics in Television, Race, Gender, and Class

Katherine Contess, CUNY Brooklyn College (last updated: 11 Oct 2018)  https://www.hastac.org/sites/default/files/upload/files/post/contess_syllabus_5.23.17.pdf

Games and Culture

Course Description

This course examines the social, cultural, economic, and political aspects of digital games. Topics include the socio-technical aspects of digital gaming, embodiment and space, communities, spectatorship and performance, gender, race, sexuality, e-sports and sports games, and the politics and economics of production processes, including co-creation and intellectual property. (last updated: 30 Sep 2016)  https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies-writing/cms-616j-games-and-culture-fall-2014/

Games for Social Change

Course Description

Run as a workshop, students collaborate in teams to design and prototype games for social change and civic engagement. Through readings, discussion, and presentations, we explore principles of game design and the social history of games. Guest speakers from academia, industry, the non-profit sector, and the gaming community contribute unique and diverse perspectives. Course culminates in an end of semester open house to showcase our games. (last updated: 30 Sep 2016)  https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies-writing/cms-615-games-for-social-change-fall-2013/

Gender and Development: A Focus on Housing and Work

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://www-personal.umich.edu/~hema/UP659Syllabus.htm

Gender and Media

Antonio Lopez, John Cabot University (last updated: 11 Oct 2018)  http://www.openmediaeducation.net/gendermedia/

Gender and Media

Brooke Erin Duffy (last updated: 23 Oct 2018)  https://static1.squarespace.com/static/58b37319ff7c508925e2d112/t/5a1d5120419202136974710e/1511870753243/Gender+and+Media+Syllabus-Duffy-fall2017-final.pdf

Gender History

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/lnewman/AMH5930_Syllabus.html

Gender Issues in Latin American History: Gender and Nation

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://www.oberlin.edu/faculty/svolk/HIST366.html

Gender Issues in Management (AK/ADMS 3120)

(last updated: 18 Sep 2016)  http://www.yorku.ca/lripley/gimsyllabushybrid.htm

Gender, Genre, and Political Transformations: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/~mferree/CGES804/syllabus.htm

Gender, Law & Politics

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://faculty.uml.edu/sgallagher/Glp2000net.htm

Gender, Sexuality, and Power in Screen Studies

(last updated: 8 Nov 2018)  http://files.cargocollective.com/18691/GenderPower2016.pdf

Images of Women in French Cinema

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://www.stanford.edu/class/frengen192e/

Language and Gender

(last updated: 18 Sep 2016)  http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jlawler/gender.html

Language and Gender (ANTH242)

(last updated: 18 Sep 2016)  https://rabi.phys.virginia.edu/mySIS/CS2/sectiontip.php?Semester=1092&ClassNumber=10081

Language and Gender (ENGL 473)

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://faculty.washington.edu/stygall/ENGL473SylAut03.htm

Lesbian and Gay Cinema

Julia Lesage, University of Oregon (last updated: 2 Oct 2018)  http://screensite.org/wp-content/themes/directorypress/thumbs//Julia-Lesage-Lesbian-and-Gay-Cinema.pdf

Major Authors: Melville and Morrison

Course Description

This seminar provides intensive study of texts by two American authors (Herman Melville, 1819-1891, and Toni Morrison, 1931-) who, using lyrical, radically innovative prose, explore in different ways epic notions of American identity. Focusing on Melville's Typee (1846), Moby-Dick (1851), and The Confidence-Man (1857) and Morrison's Sula (1973), Beloved (1987),Jazz (1992), and Paradise (1998), the class will address their common concerns with issues of gender, race, language, and nationhood. Be prepared to read deeply (i.e. a small number of texts with considerable care), to draw on a variety of sources in different media, and to employ them in creative research, writing, and multimedia projects. (last updated: 27 Sep 2016)  https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/literature/21l-705-major-authors-melville-and-morrison-fall-2003/

Marriage and Sexuality in Medieval Europe

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://falcon.arts.cornell.edu/prh3/368/index.html

Media in Cultural Context: Popular Readerships

Course Description

What is the history of popular reading in the Western world? How does widespread access to print relate to distinctions between highbrow and lowbrow culture, between good taste and bad judgment, and between men and women readers? This course will introduce students to the broad history of popular reading and to controversies about taste and gender that have characterized its development. Our grounding in historical material will help make sense of our main focus: recent developments in the theory and practice of reading, including fan-fiction, Oprah's book club, comics, hypertext, mass-market romance fiction, mega-chain bookstores, and reader response theory. (last updated: 27 Sep 2016)  https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/literature/21l-715-media-in-cultural-context-popular-readerships-fall-2007/

New Culture of Gender: Queer France

Course Description

This course addresses the place of contemporary queer identities in French discourse and discusses the new generation of queer authors and their principal concerns. Class discussions and readings will introduce students to the main classical references of queer subcultures, from Proust and Vivien to Hocquenghem and Wittig. Throughout the course, students will examines current debates on post-colonial and globalized queer identities through essays, songs, movies, and novels. Authors covered include Didier Eribon, Anne Garréta, Abdellah Taïa, Anne Scott, and Nina Bouraoui. This class is taught in French. (last updated: 27 Sep 2016)  https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/global-studies-and-languages/21g-325j-new-culture-of-gender-queer-france-fall-2011/

New Media Literacies

Course Description

This course serves as an in-depth look at literacy theory in media contexts, from its origins in ancient Greece to its functions and changes in the current age of digital media, participatory cultures, and technologized learning environments. Students will move quickly through traditional historical accounts of print literacies; the majority of the semester will focus on treating literacy as more than a functional skill (i.e., one's ability to read and write) and instead as a sophisticated set of meaning-making activities situated in specific social spaces. These new media literacies include the practices and concepts of: fan fiction writing, online social networking, videogaming, appropriation and remixing, transmedia navigation, multitasking, performance, distributed cognition, and collective intelligence. Assignments include weekly reading and writing assignments and an original research project. Readings will include Plato, Goody and Watt, Scribner and Cole, Graff, Brandt, Heath, Lemke, Gee, Alvermann, Jenkins, Hobbs, Pratt, Leander, Dyson, Levy, Kress, and Lankshear and Knobel. (last updated: 9 Oct 2016)  https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies-writing/cms-998-new-media-literacies-spring-2007/

NextLab I: Designing Mobile Technologies for the Next Billion Users

Course Description

Can you make a cellphone change the world? NextLab is a hands-on year-long design course in which students research, develop and deploy mobile technologies for the next billion mobile users in developing countries. Guided by real-world needs as observed by local partners, students work in multidisciplinary teams on term-long projects, closely collaborating with NGOs and communities at the local level, field practitioners, and experts in relevant fields. Students are expected to leverage technical ingenuity in both mobile and internet technologies together with social insight in order to address social challenges in areas such as health, microfinance, entrepreneurship, education, and civic activism. Students with technically and socially viable prototypes may obtain funding for travel to their target communities, in order to obtain the first-hand feedback necessary to prepare their technologies for full fledged deployment into the real world (subject to guidelines and limitations). (last updated: 30 Sep 2016)  https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/media-arts-and-sciences/mas-965-nextlab-i-designing-mobile-technologies-for-the-next-billion-users-fall-2008/

Race and Gender in Cinema - TV

Antonio Lopez, John Cabot University (last updated: 11 Oct 2018)  http://www.openmediaeducation.net/race-gender-14/

Race, Gender, and Economic Status

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://bernard.pitzer.edu/~lyamane/econ120.htm

Readings in Western Women's History

(last updated: 27 Sep 2018)  http://csivc.csi.cuny.edu/westweb/files/pages/lavusyl.html

Technologies of Humanism

Course Description

This course explores the properties of non-sequential, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives as they have evolved from print to digital media. Works covered in this course range from the Talmud, classics of non-linear novels, experimental literature, early sound and film experiments to recent multi-linear and interactive films and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and of storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, properties of digital media and hypertext. Questions that will be addressed in this course include: How can we define ‘non-sequentiality/multi-linearity’, ‘interactivity’, ‘narrative’. To what extend are these aspects determined by the text, the reader, the digital format? What are the roles of the reader and the author? What kinds of narratives are especially suited for a non-linear/interactive format? Are there stories that can only be told in a digital format? What can we learn from early non-digital examples of non-linear and interactive story telling? (last updated: 27 Sep 2016)  https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/literature/21l-708-technologies-of-humanism-spring-2003/

Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology

Course Description

Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and explore issues embedded in debates about new media, including questions of class, gender, youth, sex, and violence. Such topics will be placed in cross-cultural perspective, allowing us to compare the nature of panics over contemporary events and issues—e.g. the Columbine school shootings, cyber-bullying, Japanese otaku, and the Chinese "Human Flesh Search Engine"—occurring within both the United States and East Asia. Students will read essays, keep media journals and watch films pertaining to weekly topics. (last updated: 30 Sep 2016)  https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies-writing/cms-s60-technopanics-moral-panics-about-technology-spring-2013/

The Anthropology of Sound

Course Description

This class examines the ways humans experience the realm of sound and how perceptions and technologies of sound emerge from cultural, economic, and historical worlds. In addition to learning about how environmental, linguistic, and musical sounds are construed cross-culturally, students learn about the rise of telephony, architectural acoustics, and sound recording, as well as about the globalized travel of these technologies. Questions of ownership, property, authorship, and copyright in the age of digital file sharing are also addressed. A major concern will be with how the sound/noise boundary has been imagined, created, and modeled across diverse sociocultural and scientific contexts. Auditory examples — sound art, environmental recordings, music — will be provided and invited throughout the term. (last updated: 27 Sep 2016)  https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/anthropology/21a-360j-the-anthropology-of-sound-spring-2008/

The Economics of Gender

(last updated: 18 Sep 2016)  http://www.oswego.edu/~kane/eco151syl.pdf

Topics in Indian Popular Culture: Spectacle, Masala, and Genre

Course Description

This course aims to provide an overview of Indian popular culture over the last two decades, through a variety of material such as popular fiction, music, television and Bombay cinema. The class will explore major themes and their representations in relation to current social and political issues. In particular, students will examine the elements of the formulaic "masala movie", music and melodrama, the ideas of nostalgia and incumbent change in youth culture, as well as shifting questions of gender and sexuality in popular fiction. During the course, students will look at some journalistic writing, advertising clips and political cartoons to understand the relation between the popular culture and the social imagery of a nation. This course is taught in English. (last updated: 27 Sep 2016)  https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/global-studies-and-languages/21g-011-topics-in-indian-popular-culture-spectacle-masala-and-genre-fall-2006/

Women and Film

Julia Lesage, University of Oregon (last updated: 2 Oct 2018)  http://screensite.org/wp-content/themes/directorypress/thumbs//Julia-Lesage-Women-and-Film.pdf

Women and Gender in Europe

(last updated: 27 Sep 2018)  http://mccandlessa.people.cofc.edu/syl252.htm

Women and Gender in the Middle East

(last updated: 18 Sep 2016)  http://www.academia.edu/18875365/Syllabus_Women_and_Gender_in_the_Middle_East_undergraduate_

Women and Gender in the United States

(last updated: 27 Sep 2018)  http://mccandlessa.people.cofc.edu/syl590.htm

Women and Power in 19-Century America

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://www.oberlin.edu/faculty/classer/History322/

Women and Social Movements in Antebellum America

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://www.oberlin.edu/faculty/classer/2002syllabus.html

Women and the Polis (CCIV 243/WMST 211)

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://mkatz.web.wesleyan.edu/cciv243/cciv243.syllabus.html

Women Artists (ART 380)

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://www.bluffton.edu/womenartists/syl.html

Women in Antiquity: Greece

(last updated: 18 Sep 2016)  http://www.stoa.org/diotima/syllabi/skinsyll.shtml

Women in New York City, 1890-1940

(last updated: 18 Sep 2016)  https://csivc.csi.cuny.edu/history/files/lavender/386/386hub.html

Women in the American West

(last updated: 27 Sep 2018)  http://womenwest.doinghistory.com/syllabus/

Women's History and Feminist Theory

(last updated: 18 Sep 2016)  https://www.amherst.edu/media/view/341176/original/Feminist+Theory+Syllabus.pdf

Women. Minorities, and the Media (J320)

(last updated: 4 Apr 2012)  http://pages.uoregon.edu/dmerskin/wmm.htm

Writing About Race: Narratives of Multiraciality

Course Description

In this course we will read essays, novels, memoirs, and graphic texts, and view documentary and experimental films and videos which explore race from the standpoint of the multiracial. Examining the varied work of multiracial authors and filmmakers such as Danzy Senna, Ruth Ozeki, Kip Fulbeck, James McBride and others, we will focus not on how multiracial people are seen or imagined by the dominant culture, but instead on how they represent themselves. How do these authors approach issues of family, community, nation, language and history? What can their work tell us about the complex interconnections between race, gender, class, sexuality, and citizenship? Is there a relationship between their experiences of multiraciality and a willingness to experiment with form and genre? In addressing these and other questions, we will endeavor to think and write more critically and creatively about race as a social category and a lived experience. (last updated: 28 Sep 2016)  https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies-writing/21w-742j-writing-about-race-narratives-of-multiraciality-fall-2008/

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